Obituaries, March 18, 2015

1

Janet Segal Kirshner
On March 15, Janet S. Kirshner of Hightstown, N.J., formerly of Bethesda, died after a long battle with Parkinson’s disease, peripheral neuropathy and macular degeneration. She was 90.

Born in Washington, D.C. on July 7, 1924, Janet was an intelligent, driven and accomplished woman. She graduated from George Washington University in 1945 with a Bachelor of Arts in psychology and received a Master of Arts in counseling and personnel administration in 1949.


Throughout her adult life, she was an active member of the League of Women Voters of Montgomery County, the National Woman’s Committee of Brandeis University, the Beth El Congregation of Montgomery County and the Commission for Women for Montgomery County. She also was a program coordinator for senior citizens of the Jewish Community Center from 1979–1996.

She lived in the Washington, D.C. area for the first 80 years of her life until the death of Joseph M. Kirshner, her husband of almost 55 years, in 2004. She moved to Hightstown, N.J. to Meadow Lakes, a senior living community, where she spent the last 11 years of her life. As a resident, she remained an active participant in the community by continuing to improve the lives of those who live at Meadow Lakes.

https://www.washingtonjewishweek.com/enewsletter/

She is survived by daughters Sandra K. Spetgang of Gaithersburg (Isaac) and Judith A. Kirshner of Princeton, N.J. (P. Joseph Campisi, Jr.); grandchildren Aviva and Ari Spetgang, and Jessica, Emma, Natalie and Samantha Campisi; and many beloved nieces and nephews. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to the Jewish Foundation for Group Homes, 1500 E Jefferson St, Rockville, Md. 20852.

Jonathan Henry Pincus
Neurologist academician Dr. Jonathan Henry Pincus died on Feb. 23 in Washington, D.C. at the age of 79.  At the time of his death he was serving as Chief of the Neurology Service at the DC VA Medical Center, as Professor of Neurology at Georgetown University and as Clinical Professor of Neurology at George Washington University School of Medicine.  His areas of specialty were metabolic neurological disorders such as Leigh’s Disease, mechanism of action of anti-seizure drugs such as Phenobarbitol and Dilantin, and Parkinsons Disease and other movement disorders.


Born in Brooklyn, New York, to Hannah and Dr. Joseph B. Pincus, a prominent pediatrician, he attended Amherst College and obtained his MD degree from Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons.  He spent 25 years at Yale University rising from a Resident to a full Professor of Neurology. In 1986 he was appointed Chair of Neurology at Georgetown University becoming Chairman Emeritus in 2000.

Dr. Pincus was a Fellow of the American Academy of Neurology and served for two years as a vice-president and was a member of the American Neurological Association where he served as a counselor for two years.

In addition to the more than 150 articles published in peer reviewed journals and as chapters and editorials, he co-authored a well-known textbook, Behavioral Neurology, with Gary Tucker, four editions, used extensively in residency training programs in Neurology and Psychiatry; and published a popular book, based on extensive research on the neurological basis for violent crime, entitled, Base Instincts – What Makes Killers Kill.

A loving husband to wife Joan (Maslansky) and father to Daniel, Jeremy (Sherry) and Adam (Ayelet) and brother to Dr. Matthew (Naomi) Pincus, to step-daughters Alyson (Daniel) and Debra, and to 20 grandchildren and two great-grandchildren.

Never miss a story.
Sign up for our newsletter.
Email Address

1 COMMENT

  1. Dr. Pincus was my Neurologist for years at Georgetown Univ Hospital. I grew to love him as my doctor and looked forward to my yearly visits. I only changed doctors when he changed his schedule and was only taking visits one day a week and the schedule wasn’t convenient for me and my mom as she generally accompanied me on my visits. My prayers and sincerest condolences are with his family. I pray that God provides what you need going forward. He was dearly loved and will be genuinely missed.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here